Campuses:

Finite Element Method

Thursday, December 15, 2016 - 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Matthias Maier (University of Minnesota, Twin Cities)
Joint work with Dionisios Margetis (University of Maryland) and Mitchell Luskin (University of Minnesota).

The electric conductivity of atomically thick materials such as graphene and black phosphorous yields an effective complex permittivity with a negative real part in the infrared spectrum. This feature allows for the propagation of slowly decaying electromagnetic waves, called surface plasmons-polaritons (SPPs), that are confined near the material interface with wavelengths much shorter than the wavelength of the free-space radiation.
Thursday, December 15, 2016 - 9:00am - 10:00am
Andre Nicolet (Aix-Marseille Université)
Our purpose is to develop a numerical tool for the study of photonic devices. The electrodynamic behavior of these systems can be efficiently characterized by their resonances but realistic materials have a strong time dispersive permittivity at optical frequencies and it therefore depends on the very frequency we are trying to compute via an eigenvalue problem.
 
Wednesday, December 14, 2016 - 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Christian Engström (University of Umeå)
Functions whose values are unbounded linear operators describe a large number of processes in optics. The applications include photonic crystals with material properties of Drude-Lorentz type and computations of scattering resonances.
Wednesday, June 27, 2012 - 3:00pm - 3:50pm
Harold Park (Boston University)
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